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20121216
20121216
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barack obama and michelle obama, and rachel, from what i understand, took a larger view looking at the first lady and her larger ancestry and putting together a larger story as a result. >> host: now, bob -- >> guest: now, those -- >> host: go ahead, please. >> guest: no, i was just going to say of the three, my favorite was the marines. it was exhaustive and exhausting. there's every detail, and it ends as obama is going off to harvard or just enters harvard law school. it's a coming of age biography, the early part of the president's life, and it was very well researched. the jodi book on the political marriage, i thought it was a bit forced. i feel unless you're part of a marriage, it's awful hard to understand, and, especially, when she -- cantor tried to make the case that michelle obama was far more political than she would let on and political tension, a lot of sort of counts of fighting in the obama white house, reported widely in the early days. rachel's history was valuable because we forget although the attention is on president obama being the first black president,
list on the upper right side of the page. >> host: rachel cox, who was rob cox? >> guest: rob cox is my deceased uncle who made the decision in june of 1941, six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against fascism and went to england and enlisted as aen officer candidate with the british -- as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him four friends, another man who was a student at harvard and three dartmouth guys who had recently graduated and were intent on doing what they could to help the cause of freedom and liberty against the forces of nazi fascism. >> host: and so he was studying at harvard at the time. what was he studying, and what was his life trajectory at that point? >> guest: well, he, like his -- he, like his fore brothers, had grown up in new jersey and vermont where his family had had property for quite, several generations. he went to prep school at st. paul school where he distinguished himself as a student and as a student leader and as an athlete. and like all his brothe
going through my head from jeremiah, and rachel weeping and winner with her no more and i woke up crying and couldn't stop crying and thought you know, other people need to cry, too. >> our panel is back with us now. you know, we've talked a little about the policies surrounding all of this, but you know, dealing with it, charles, has been frankly tough for a lot of people. >> well, it's very hard. we have the mass media and ever since the kennedy assassination when these things happen we become a community. that was the really the first time we nationally mourned and it's very difficult to do. i think when we talk about it happening at the community level, at the family level, there are these mental health experts who go in and they counsel and i think they do an extraordinary job. but in the end we really come up against that question that you asked the rabbi earlier in the show for these, i mean, the most profound explanations are often the most, or theological and we really don't have very good theological explanations, it's called the problem of the presence of evil and the presence
's sister, rachel, was the first killed in the massacre in colorado and he was in the school library during that rampage. thanks for being with us this morning. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> i remember your story vividly. the whole country does. you were a young man in those hours after columbine and you spoke out so compellingly and compassionately and poignantly and i can only imagine now how more reports of school massacres like this affect you. what happened on friday when you heard the news? >> like everyone, just extreme sadness and brokenhearted. i knew that i especially felt for parents who lost their children and how devastated they were going to be. also it just -- it also just made me think about kind of where my generation is as far as what our values are and even the spiritual condition of our generation. because i look at the last few shootings that happened all from guys in their 20s, and it made me angry. >> craig, i was there for the weeks that followed at columbine as well being from denver, i unfortunately covered that. i'm curious about what you said about your generati
of the new orleans worker's center, rachel justice. joined mcel fee, and she's worked with the afl cio among others. and vice president of the nation's largest union, the national education association. the question i want to begin with is -- why now? why is this happening now? >> oh, i know. >> please. >> this is a lot of political payback. there's a three-prong approach that the coke brothers and their illi it were are taking. it's all about winning something for them so up to say, corporations are people, meaning money is people. you have to vote suppress. when moms and grandmas and college students and minorities show up, the brothers lose. why did we see six-hour waiting lines? they understand that. the third thing, labor unions. where was the ground game for this? where are the people that got people to the polls and did the phone calls? more than that, labor folks are your neighbors. one in every 100 americans is a member of the national education association. we live in neighborhoods that -- >> if you live in a big enough apartment building. >> you'll know somebody that's a teacher a
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5